JEA Curriculum Highlight: Chunking, Linking and Liking – Making Online Stories Reader-Friendly

If you’re looking for a nice 45-90 minute activity for class that should help your writers level up their online stories and see how they are different from print stories, this is the activity for you.

The lesson is part of the JEA curriculum and covers three methods of making online stories easier for the reader to understand. The lesson includes a slideshow to kick things off and you’ll need to grab a story from student media or the local press, but other than that, you should be set.

I used the lesson with my own students and found it to be a great one for them to gain a quick understanding on how web stories should be different. It was also a nice small group activity for them to participate in and work together on as they learned.

This curriculum is available to all JEA members. To access the curriculum, you must be logged in to the JEA Curriculum site. Once you are, you can access this lesson here: Chunking, Linking and Liking: Making Online Stories Reader-Friendly

Check out the video here to learn more about the JEA Curriculum. If you’re a member you can login to access the curriculum here. If you’d like more information about the benefits of JEA or if you want to join JEA, you can find more information on JEA.org.

Aaron Manfull

Aaron is in his 24th year of advising student media. He is currently the Director of Student Media at Francis Howell North High School in St. Charles, Missouri. He is the Journalism Education Association Digital Media Chair and co-Director of Media Now. He created The Next 26 and is a former Dow Jones News Fund National Journalism Teacher of the Year. He is one of the authors of the textbook "Student Journalism and Media Literacy." You can find him on Twitter and Instragram @manfull. He's a proud father. A transplanted Iowan. And an avid Hawkeye Fan.

Aaron Manfull has 817 posts and counting. See all posts by Aaron Manfull

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